Length calibration

How long is a meter?

The metric system was introduced by law in Denmark 4th May 1907 and became effective the 1st April 1912. At that time the meter was defined by the distance between two marks on a platinum-iridium prototype (at 0 °C) kept at the BIPM in Paris.
Today, the meter is one of the seven base units of the SI system and is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299.792.458 of a second.
The Danish primary standard of length is kept at and maintained by DFM.

DFM offers a range of services within the field of length, summarized in the data sheet here

 

Calibration of gauge blocks

Gauge blocks calibrated traceable to the Danish primary standard by a method that uses light waves ability to exhibit interference - also called interferometric calibration.
The calibration is DANAK accredited (Accreditation No. 255).
Product information and prices can be found here

 

Calibration of distance sensors

Calibration of e.g. laser based distance sensors for quality assurance in production and for documentation of compliance with regulatory requirements.
The calibration is traceable to the Danish primary standard of length

 

Uncertainties of calibration


Uncertainty of calibration - Absolute length

Gauge blocks complying with ISO3650 or similar.

Class Material Nominal Length Uncertainty
00 or K Steel, carbide or ceramics < 100 mm 23 nm - 43 nm

Uncertainty of calibration - Length difference

Gauge blocks from the same set, in accordance with ISO3650 or similar.

Class Material Nominal Length Uncertainty
00 or K Steel, carbide or ceramics < 100 mm 15 nm

Pricelist

We hope to create an easy overview of some of our services by giving you the opportunity to download the price list.

Download pricelist 

Please review our pricelist. If you do not find what you are looking for, do not hesitate to contact us.

If you have questions, please use this form.